Day 100!

 "It all comes back to the writing. These pages feel like home. I've filled journals upon journals upon journals. I capture all the in-between moments on these pages. The ones I would easily forget and gloss over. But these are the moments that matter. These moments make up my life. And so I will always continue to write and write and write. To remember. To reclaim. To rediscover. (January '17)

"It all comes back to the writing. These pages feel like home. I've filled journals upon journals upon journals. I capture all the in-between moments on these pages. The ones I would easily forget and gloss over. But these are the moments that matter. These moments make up my life. And so I will always continue to write and write and write. To remember. To reclaim. To rediscover. (January '17)

Yesterday marked the final day of #the100dayproject. For the past 100 days straight, I've shared excerpts of my journal entries from over the years and paired them with a watercolored piece that I painted that day. I took my watercolors and materials with me when I traveled. Even when my schedule was jam-packed, I made sure I carved out some time for my art. I have never been so committed to a project before. I noticed the pressure increasing on myself as the project was coming to a close.

This last piece taught me the greatest lesson. I wanted my 100th post to be amazing! To end with a bang! To be perfect! Which is so counterintuitive to everything that I had learned before. When I put pressure on myself to create, that's exactly when I feel jammed up. When I get stuck. I went through three rough drafts of the backdrop colors and thought, "This is so ridiculous. I've never re-done a piece of work to make it look a certain way." It didn't feel good. I reminded myself that it should 'feel like play.' So I took my fingers and started smearing the paint around, half out of frustration, half out of artistic angst, and then let it dry.

I came back to it after an hour and saw it differently. I noticed the purple blob that I once felt had ruined the entire piece could actually be the spotlight for something else. Something like a silhouette. And a feeling of pure joy jolted through my body, and I painted how I felt. 

I've learned that art has no rules. What we think are mistakes at first can actually be the catalyst for something else- something much more delightful, joyful, and free. This is a lesson that extends far beyond watercolors. Something that I teach my clients every day. It just so happened that it showed up in my art, on Day 100, and allowed me to understand its beauty and meaning in a whole new way.